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Children and Families

    Results: 16

  • Abuse Counseling (1)
    RP-1400.8000-020

    Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020

    Programs that provide individual, conjoint, family or group treatment for people who are experiencing physical, sexual, emotional and/or other forms of abuse in the context a marital, parental, sibling or other family relationship or, in some instances, outside the family. Included are programs that provide therapeutic interventions for perpetrators and/or for individuals who have been victimized.
  • Adolescent/Youth Counseling (2)
    RP-1400.8000-050

    Adolescent/Youth Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-050

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of adolescents, usually age 12 or 13 through 17, who have adjustment problems, behavior problems, emotional disturbance, a personality disorder or incipient mental illness. The programs may help youth troubled by low self-esteem, social isolation, peer pressure, bullying, school performance issues, truancy, anger management issues, family problems, grief and loss, sexual promiscuity, sexually transmitted disease, alcohol or drug addiction, eating disorders, oppositional and defiant behaviors, depression and anxiety, suicidal thoughts or other difficult issues.
  • Adoption Services (1)
    PH-0300

    Adoption Services

    PH-0300

    Programs that participate in arranging permanent homes under new legal parentage for individuals whose birth parents are unable or unwilling to provide for their care. Included are programs that provide counseling and assistance for people who decide to relinquish their children for adoption or arrange for an independent adoption; which recruit, select, counsel and match suitable adoptive parents with children who have been relinquished; which assist in the adoption of stepchildren, adults or foreign-born children; which provide foster care for children who have been relinquished for adoption but not yet placed; and/or which assist people who are adopted to locate their birth parents and birth parents to locate the children they relinquished.
  • Adult/Child Mentoring Programs (1)
    PH-1400.5000-100

    Adult/Child Mentoring Programs

    PH-1400.5000-100

    Programs like Big Brothers or Big Sisters which provide male or female adult companionship, guidance and/or role models for young men or women who are from families in which adult figures of the same sex are absent or available on a limited and inadequate basis or who are troubled and at risk for delinquency. Also included are programs in which people in their teens provide companionship for younger children.
  • Child Abuse Prevention (1)
    FN-1500.1900-150

    Child Abuse Prevention

    FN-1500.1900-150

    Programs, often offered in the schools or in other community settings, that attempt to protect children from physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse or exploitation through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with children and/or the community at large. The sessions may offer suggestions for children and/or parents regarding ways of avoiding or handling an abusive or potentially abusive situation and/or information about the indicators and incidence of abuse, requirements for reporting abuse and community resources that are available to children who have been abused and to their families.
  • Child Guidance (2)
    RP-1400.8000-155

    Child Guidance

    RP-1400.8000-155

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of children from infancy to age 12 who have adjustment problems, behavior problems, emotional disturbances, a personality disorder or incipient mental illness.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (2)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Family Based Services (5)
    PH-2360

    Family Based Services

    PH-2360

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support healthy family development, improve the family's ability to resolve problems (such as poverty, unemployment, ill health, homelessness, substandard housing, educational difficulties, substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, delinquency and physical and developmental problems) and prevent the need for unnecessary placement of children in foster care, group homes, inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment programs, residential training schools or other alternative environments when family problems reach crisis proportions. Services may include home visiting services that focus on public health issues (especially prenatal), mental health and substance abuse counseling, home management instruction, success in a child care setting, parenting skills development, stress management, tutoring, pregnancy awareness and AIDS awareness; may be available to the community at large, to families at risk for dissolution or those currently in crisis; and may be offered by a single agency or a coalition of agencies that have agreed to provide services according to a coordinated case plan.
  • Family Counseling (8)
    RF-2000

    Family Counseling

    RF-2000

    Programs that offer therapeutic sessions that focus on the system of relationships and communication patterns among family members and which attempt to modify those relationships and patterns to achieve greater harmony. The therapist focuses on the family as a unit rather than concentrating on one of the members who is singled out as the person in need of treatment.
  • Family Support Centers/Outreach (1)
    PH-2360.2400

    Family Support Centers/Outreach

    PH-2360.2400

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support the healthy development of families, improve family interaction skills and help fragile families to resolve their problems at a pre-crisis stage before they become unmanageable. Services may be center-based or provided on an outreach basis to families who are initially reluctant to seek support and generally target the specific needs of a particular community. Included may be self-sufficiency programs which help families break the cycle of poverty by addressing the barriers to self-sufficiency; early child development and school success programs; programs which address the needs of teen parents; programs which target parents at risk for becoming abusive; programs for families with children who have special developmental needs and programs that focus on the maternal and child health care needs of first-time, expectant women whose babies are at high risk for low birth weight and infant mortality.
  • Foster Home Placement (2)
    PH-2400.1900

    Foster Home Placement

    PH-2400.1900

    Programs that link individuals who are in need of alternative living arrangements with appropriate private family homes that are licensed to provide foster care. Licensing requirements vary from state to state and, in some situations, licensing is not required at all. Programs that provide placement services for children and adults with disabilities are generally also responsible for recruiting, training, certifying and monitoring placements in family homes and for providing support for the family and the individual(s) with disabilities who live with them.
  • Parent Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.6500-650

    Parent Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500-650

    Mutual support groups for parents who share a common characteristic or circumstance such as being single parents, dual career parents, multiple birth parents, parents with children who are out of control, or parents of children with disabilities, who come together for educational and social purposes as well as for mutual support. Meeting formats may include in-person, telephone or Internet options.
  • Parenting/Family Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.6500

    Parenting/Family Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500

    Mutual support groups whose members are individuals who have experiences relating to adoption, birth control, family planning, pregnancy, childbirth, foster care, kinship care, marriage, parenting, separation/divorce, single parenting, step families, blended families, grandparent rights or other family situations. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide an opportunity for participants to share their experience, strengths and hopes, understand their relationships and work through related emotions.
  • Preschools (1)
    HD-1800.6500

    Preschools

    HD-1800.6500

    Programs that provide educational experiences and activities for children who are younger than compulsory school age, supplement parental care and home play and stimulate intellectual, social, emotional and motor skills development. Activities generally include preacademic skill development such as shape, color and number recognition; active outdoor play; observation of nature and pets; dancing and rhythms; block building; playhouse activities; games; simple excursions outside the school; stories and picture books. Children are also given a nutritious snack and/or meal and a period for adequate rest, and are taught basic cleanliness and good health habits.
  • Wellness Programs (1)
    LH-2700.9500

    Wellness Programs

    LH-2700.9500

    Programs that offer individual and/or group sessions which assist participants to understand how their lifestyle impacts their physical and mental health and to develop personal practices that enhance their total well-being. Wellness programs are holistic and combine a variety of components which may include a general physical examination that is tailored to the individual's needs; an evaluation of the person's pattern of exercise, eating habits, sources of stress and other lifestyle elements that are potential risk factors; and the development and implementation of an individualized plan for prevention management and early intervention to optimize health and performance which may include physical fitness sessions, nutrition counseling, stress reduction techniques, biofeedback, practice in assuming responsibility for one's choices, and other specific measures for avoiding physical and mental health problems.
  • Wraparound Facilitation/Community Support (11)
    PH-2360.9500

    Wraparound Facilitation/Community Support

    PH-2360.9500

    Programs that employ the Wraparound Facilitation model, a family centered, community-oriented, strengths based and highly individualized approach to meet the needs of children with complicated, multi-dimensional problems. The approach involves the development of a child and family team which creates and implements a wraparound plan that identifies a set of community services and natural supports to promote success, safety, and permanence in home, school and community. The Wraparound facilitator coordinates team meetings and ensures the team identifies and prioritizes goals, provides crisis and safety planning, and tracks the family's progress towards goal attainment. The family is prepared and supported as they transition from formal services to independence. While the major initiative to develop Wraparound Facilitation originated with the mental health system and has been particularly successful for children and adolescents with severe emotional and behavioral problems, the intervention is being employed in a number of other child service sectors including education, juvenile justice and child welfare.